Seeking pros help

Added: Oriana Hickerson - Date: 20.04.2022 11:46 - Views: 33788 - Clicks: 6111

Some young people might question why they should get support from a health professional, while others worry that getting help is embarrassing or a of weakness. This is a chance to talk with them about their concerns — encourage them to try getting support before making any decisions about its usefulness. It can also be helpful to explain the many benefits of seeking support from a health professional. They listen, talk through ideas and help the young person to consider their options for managing their symptoms.

If they feel that a young person needs more help, or that their symptoms are taking a long time to subside, the health professional may consider referring the young person to a specialist, like a psychiatrist. Your local GP is often a good starting point when your child or young person needs help. Depending on the situation, the GP might provide ongoing care or suggest that another mental health professional or support service get involved. Mental health professionals can be accessed through your GP, community health centre, public mental health services, hepace centres and private health clinics.

Transcultural mental health centres, migrant resource centres and ethnic community councils can also offer support for young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds. If there is resistance to seeking professional help, tread very lightly, but persist. Young people benefit most from these sessions if they feel comfortable, respected and supported. It can take a few sessions before a young person feels comfortable talking with a health professional, so encouraging them to persevere is really important.

If your young person is experiencing severe symptoms, their treating health professional might suggest they take medication. It can also be helpful to provide young people with some idea about what to expect when they see a health professional. Let them know that there will probably be lots of questions initially as the health professional gets to know them — questions about their general health and lifestyle, work and school or university experiences, relationships, and how long they have been feeling this way.

Many services offered by your local doctor, community health services, hepace or public youth mental health services are either free or paid for partly by the government under Medicare. To receive free services under Medicare for anxiety and depression, your young person will need a Mental Health Treatment Plan from their doctor. A Mental Health Treatment Plan outlines what treatment is required and why, the of sessions available to the young person, and who the young person can see for ongoing care.

Some services may charge fees on top of the Medicare benefit but may offer a discount for health care card holders or for those with special circumstances. Some services are also covered by private health insurance. By talking about the fees when you first contact the heath professional, you can be clear on the costs involved. Help your young person identify the benefits of the sessions so far and any concerns they might have about the process.

Throughout the recovery journey, your young person might also need different types of help from more than one health professional. up below for regular s filled with information, advice and support for you or your loved ones. Professional support and treatment Some young people might question why they should get support from a health professional, while others worry that getting help is embarrassing or a of weakness. Finding a health professional Your local GP is often a good starting point when your child or young person needs help. Once your young person begins therapy, their health professional can recommend how often they attend sessions.

Health professionals — who provides what? Understanding different treatment options The main form of treatment for anxiety and depression are psychological therapies talking therapies. There are a of variations that focus on different elements of our thoughts and behaviour, but they share some common similarities. Find out about psychological therapies. Find out about medical treatments. Helping to prepare It can also be helpful to provide young people with some idea about what to expect when they see a health professional.

They won't judge you or the person at risk, they will only seek to assess what it happening and how the person can be helped. There is absolutely no shame in seeking help from these services, and it is not an 'easy option'. It takes real strength and courage to get to the point when a person admits they need help. Go and seek the help that's available, but just take it one step at a time.

Cost of getting help Many services offered by your local doctor, community health services, hepace or public youth mental health services are either free or paid for partly by the government under Medicare. Find out more Learn about different health professionals Find out more about medical treatments Find out more about psychological therapies Practical tips for supporting your young person. Other s in This Section Raising resilient young people Mental health conditions in young people What to look for What causes anxiety and depression? Complete our mental health checklist Anxiety Depression Suicide Eating disorders Self-harm How to talk about mental health Professional support and treatment Recovery and staying well.

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Seeking pros help

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Benefits of seeking help for a mental health problem early on